5 Tips for Coping with Workweek Anxiety

 
Sunday-Scaries-Positively-Present

Whether you feel love, hate, or indifference for the work you do, you're probably familiar with the anxiety that can hit at the end of the weekend when you know the workweek is upon you. Even though I'm incredibly fortunate to do what I love for a living, I still face that stressful Sunday feeling (though, admittedly, it's much less intense than when I had a typical office job, but that's mostly because I work every day so there's no true start to the week for me!).

Settling my brain down on Sundays is a challenge, but I've finally come to the realization (after over a decade of working, ha!) that it's not something that's going to ever go away. So, rather than fight it each week, I've spent some time thinking about how to cope with it the best way I can. Here the five tips that help me the most when it comes to coping with the anxiety that seems to pop up right before the workweek begins...

 

1. CREATE A CALMING RITUAL. 

There's an old saying, "A Sunday well-spent brings a week of content," that I couldn't agree with more. What you do on Sunday can really set the tone for the week. For this reason, I do my best to do something relaxing and soothing on Sundays. Ideally I'd have a fixed ritual — maybe a warm bath, a walk through the park, or a creative activity — that would signify the end of the weekend and the beginning of the week, but, for now, I just try to do at least something relaxing. (I also try to work less on Sundays, if at all, but I'm still struggling with that creative work/life balance!) If there's a way to do the same relaxing activity every Sunday, I'd highly recommend it. It'll be a nice treat for you and a great way to positively transition from weekend to workweek. 

2. PREPARE WHAT YOU CAN.

When it comes to combating anxiety of any kind, one of the most helpful things I can do for myself is to be as prepared as possible. The more prepared I am for what's to come, the less I have to worry about on the big day (even if the "big day" is just a typical Monday at work!). Whenever I've had an office job (or when I have client meetings), I always prepare my outfits the night before so I don't have to think about what I'm going to wear the next day. I set everything out on garment rack and that way I can just grab what I need and I won't have to stress about what I'm going to wear. Same goes for things like lunch, to-do lists — if there's a way to prep them ahead of time, do so! It can be a bit of a pain doing the prep work, but it'll really help you start off a stress-filled day on the right foot. 

3. STAY IN THE PRESENT MOMENT. 

If you're stressed about the week ahead, it's challenging not to worry about it, particularly on Sunday nights, when it's looming ever closer. If you're a worrier or anxiety-prone, it can be tough not to let these thoughts get the best of you (even when you know they're not good for you!). One of the best ways to combat worrying about the future is to stay in the present. Schedule engaging activities (checking out a new restaurant with friends, trying some sort of exercise you don't usually do, or creating some kind of art) that'll keep your mind in the moment and distract you from your worries. If you're doing the same old routine right before a stressful day, it's going to be tough not to worry, so find something that'll keep your mind on the present moment.

4. FOCUS ON WHAT YOU ENJOY. 

When you do find your mind venturing into that worry zone, thinking about the workweek and all you have to do (or all you've not yet done! ahh!), challenge yourself by trying to turn your attention from what you don't like (aka, what you're worrying about) to what you do like. If you don't enjoy your job, this can be tricky, but, even when I've really, really disliked a job, there's always been something positive about it — like the people I worked with, the things I was learning (about the work and about myself!), the praise I received for a job well done, etc. No matter how unpleasant the job, you're learning something, and that's worthy of your gratitude. Plus, you never know where a job will lead you, so keeping an open mind to the good things (however small!) can help combat any anxiety you might be experiencing. 

 

5. CUT DOWN ON THE VENTING. 

It's tempting to chat with a friends or partner and bring up the topic of dreading the workweek, but it's not helping you or them to spend time venting about how much you dislike Monday. The "I hate Monday" mantra is an easy way to bond with others, since most of us experience some level of workweek anxiety, but the more you say it, the more you reinforce it. Your words — and thoughts! — shape your reality. In an ideal world, you'd look at yourself in the mirror every Sunday night and say, "I love Mondays!!!," but, let's be real: you're not going to do that. So, absent of adopting a pro-Monday mantra, one of the best things you can do for your workweek anxiety is pay attention to how you think and talk about the upcoming week and, if you don't have anything positive to say, at least do your best to keep in neutral.

 

If you experience workweek anxiety, you're not alone. Having had the cry-every-Sunday-night kind of job and the I'm-so-lucky-to-what-I-love kind of job, I've encountered quite a range of workweek-related emotions, and I've come to the conclusion that, no matter what your job and how you feel about it, the start of a new week can cause a lot of anxiety and stress. I hope these five tips help you cope with any workweek anxiety you might be facing, and I'd love to know if you have any additional tips, too. Let me know what you do to cope at the start of the week in the comments below! 

 

 

SundayScaries_WR-3846Thank you to Sunday Scaries for sponsoring today's post! 

Sunday Scaries are CBD gummies that are custom formulated for anxiety. We incorporate vitamins B-12 and D-3 as mood boosters and to increase the bio-availiablity of the 10mg of CBD per gummy. The gummies taste amazing and they are manufactured with a consistent dosing of full spectrum CBD to ensure reliable efficacy every time. The gummies contain zero THC, which means they are non-psychoactive and will not get you high. They are a healthy and non-habit forming alternative for anxiety relief and can be a replacement or supplement for medication. To order the gummies, visit https://forsundayscaries.com/cbdproducts/. Use promo code positivelypresent for 10% off orders!


Lettering Life Lessons: The Benefits of Creativity

 
Spring-Things-Positively-Present

If you've been following along on Instagram over the past few years, you know how much time I've spent drawing. I've done a few of these "Lettering Life Lessons" videos before, but this time I focused on the topic of creativity itself and how much I've learned from spending time doing creative things (particularly drawing). I've experienced so many benefits from taking the time to draw every day, and you can learn about just a few of them in this video. 

Head's up: it's very long (over 50 minutes!) and quite rambling at times, but you get to watch me draw the illustration you see above as well as listen to my inner monologue about how much creativity has impacted my life. If you're into podcasts, drawing, or stream-of-consciousness in someone else's head, you'll enjoy it. 

 

Can't see the video? Click here to watch on YouTube

 

Let me know what you think of the video in the comments below or on YouTube. I'd love to know...

  • Do you like videos over blog posts? Or would you rather read than listen? 
  • Do you like drawing videos? I know that's not what you signed up for, but I watch all kinds of YouTube videos about things I don't actually do in real life. (For example, I'm currently into watching this guy build realistic nature scenes for his model railroad, and I don't have or want a train. 😂 YouTube just sucks you into the weirdest stuff sometimes!)
  • Would you prefer videos where I'm just talking about a topic without drawing

If I keep doing these videos, I'll definitely be able to improve the technique (not so much rambling, fewer Barkley interruptions, etc.), but I want to know what YOU want to see! Drawing? Life lessons? Both? Something else? Let me know! 

 

PPGTL-Footer Love-Self-Footer Find-Self-Footer


 

 


6 Things Open-Minded People Do

  Open-Mind-Positively-Present

Recently I've been working on a (very exciting!) presentation on open-mindedness, and it occurred to me that it's been awhile since I've written about it here. (Though 7 Benefits of Being Open-Minded is still one of my most popular posts!) To me, this is one of the most important topics in our culture right now (so much so that I'm even thinking of writing a book about it!), so I'll probably be sharing a lot of that here, but first, let's start out with what it means to be open-minded.

The dictionary defines "open-minded" as "willing to consider new ideas; unprejudiced," but to me it's so much more than that. Open-mindedness is like positivity: it requires self-knowledge, patience, and, depending on your culture and temperament, lots and lots of practice. It's much more complex that just being open to new ideas. Here are the six traits I consider essential for open-mindedness. 

OPEN-MINDED PEOPLE... 

  1. Consider different perspectives + beliefs

    Those with open minds are open to considering different points of view, perspectives, beliefs, ideas, etc. This might seem incredibly obvious, but it's trickier than you might think. Consider, for a moment, something you believe strongly in (a religion, the rights of a certain group of people, someone you love) and then think about the last time you openly thought about a different perspective. It's easier to do when encountering a new idea, but it's something truly open-minded people do even when it comes to deeply held beliefs.  

  2. Recognize + fight against desires for generality + closure

    As humans, we have strong desires to label things clearly so we can understand them. We want to put things into neat little boxes so that we can identify them. Likewise, we have a desire to get answers that are clear and final. We love closure. Those with open minds recognize that concepts like generalization and closure are alluring, but they aren't always useful. Open-minded people see these built in human desires and fight against them to seek truth rather than answers.  

  3. Accept + embrace the concept of ambivalence

    The concept of ambivalence, or having mixed feelings or contradictory ideas about something or someone, isn't always an easy one for people to grasp. As stated in #2, we want answers and clarity. We want to know that there is a conclusion or at least an explanation. Open-minded people realize that this isn't always the case, that there are often many situations in which feelings will be mixed, in which they might hold two contradicting ideas about something. Rather than resist this, open-minded people accept it and strive to embrace it. 

  4. Understand thoughts are warped + distorted

    All the thoughts we think are distorted in some way. We are influenced not only by our moods, cultures, stress-levels, surroundings, etc., but we're also limited by what we can humanly observe with our five senses. Open-minded people seek to recognize the ways in which their own thoughts (or the thoughts of others) might be warped, and factor those distortions into account when making decisions, taking action, or aligning themselves with a belief. 

  5. View open-mindedness as a skill requiring practice

    Open-minded people recognize that open-mindedness, like any worthwhile skill, requires practice. It's something that comes more easily to some (depending on how they were raised, what culture they come from, what kind of personality they have, etc.), but regardless of what skill level they started with, open-minded people know that they need to keep practicing to keep their open-mindedness ability sharp.  

  6. Create opportunities to rethink assumptions

    Finally, and perhaps most importantly, those with open minds give themselves opportunities to rethink assumptions and consider new perspectives. They recognize the limitations of their own minds and cultures, and they actively seek out sources that will help them explore new ways of thinking. They know that what they believed at one point might not still be true today, so they work to rethink about assumptions. In a world that makes it easy to surround yourself with what's familiar, open-minded people create opportunities for themselves to learn new ways of thinking and explore a variety of points of view. 

Staying open-minded is a skill, and a particularly challenging one to cultivate in an age when we're all being fed information, advertisements, articles, etc. that align with what we've already said we like. We're all in individual bubbles, tailored just for us, which is why we have to work even harder to keep our minds (and hearts!) open. 

If you consider yourself an open-minded person, what would you add to this list? If you struggle to keep an open mind, what would you like to learn more about to enhance that skill? Also, if you have any great stories about being (or struggling to be) open-minded, I'd love to hear them in the comments below! 

 

PPGTL-Footer Love-Self-Footer Find-Self-Footer